BROOMFIELD — Nic Moschetti's quick rise in the shooting world had opened more than a few eyes.

If there was a chance to hop in a time machine and jump ahead to Tokyo in the summer of 2020 for the Games of the 32nd Olympiad, there would be more than a few takers to see what he could do.

"I was fortunate enough that when I got into this, the international side of skeet shooting, back in 2012, it was an Olympic year and got to see what it was all about," he said. "Now I am getting closer and closer to my end goal and it seems like it is so much more attainable."

Moschetti has surrounded himself with some of the greats of the shooting world — two-time Olympic gold medalist Vincent Hancock and Olympian Frank Thompson — and has the right mind-set, coaching and support system to make his dreams come true.

One man that has seen just about everything and coached everyone who is someone in the shooting world is Lloyd Woodhouse. After being a part of seven Olympics, the 81-year old Woodhouse — who makes his home in Colorado Springs — had decided to limit his coaching, but took a special interest in Moschetti.

"So many of our young people today go and try things and if they do not have instant success, they lose interest in it," said Woodhouse, who coached the Egyptian shooting team at the last Summer Games in London. "Nic has had some failures, but what he does is come back and work harder the next time.

"He trained harder and he tried to find the secrets of where he failed and how to get them fixed."


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It's hard to find any flaws in Moschetti's game. He won his first skeet shooting state title in 2011 and followed that up with two more over the next two seasons.

After he won his third title in 2013 he was named the captain of the US Junior National team. While he has represented his country in competitions all over the nation — with the blessing of Broomfield principal Ginger Ramsey and the entire staff at the school — it is the world stage that beckons over the coming years. In March of 2014 his missed making the World Championship team by one target.

But before the big stage ultimately comes calling, Moschetti will head to St. Charles, Missouri to further hone his skills at Lindenwood University for coach Shawn Dulohery — who also at one point in his career shot for Woodhouse.

Moschetti, who is currently the No. 1 ranked junior in the country, signed his official letter of intent in a ceremony at the school on Feb. 3.

"I knew that if I was going to be as competitive as I am and as successful in shooting as I have been fortunate to be that it was going to take up 100 percent of my time," said Moschetti, who credits his parents Michael and Rachelle as well as his sister Ciara with a majority of his success. "I consider it a job instead of a sport or a hobby. It takes up my entire life."

An accomplished baseball player before he went the shooting route, Moschetti has his eyes squarely on getting to Tokyo.

"I want to see if all my childhood dream of representing my country with my gun in my hand are possible," said Moschetti, who also carries a 4.0 GPA. "I've made this decision, so we are going to see where it takes me."

Said Woodhouse: "With the talent that Nic brings to the game and his motivation to succeed makes him really special. In order to achieve that success, you need the exposure, and he has had it."

Jon Yunt: yuntj@dailycamera.com or twitter.com/JonEYunt